I’ve seen so many different options for purchasing glasses online. They’re literally everywhere! What are the pros and cons of purchasing my glasses online?

Nowadays, almost anything (if not everything) can be purchased online— including prescription eyeglasses. Many online retailers have stepped up to provide seamless online services for those who wish to select and purchase their glasses online, but the options can still be pretty overwhelming. Today, we’ll be going over the pros and cons of purchasing your glasses online.

So, what are the pros of purchasing glasses from the comfort of your home? Exactly that! Convenience. You don’t have to worry about taking time out of your day to drive over to your nearest optical and try on different pairs. Many retailers offer virtual try-on features, making the process even easier. An in-person optical might not even have the styles you like or all the sizes you need, bringing me to the second biggest pro when it comes to purchasing your glasses online: retailers have wider online selections. You’ll typically find a much broader range of frame styles, colors, and brands online compared to traditional stores.

Every option is at your fingertips— which brings me to the cons of purchasing eyeglasses online.

Without trying glasses on in-person, especially if it’s a new style you haven’t delved into or your first pair, it can be challenging to determine which frames will fit most comfortably and suit your face shape best. Luckily, in addition to some retailers’ virtual-try on features, some also allow you to order sample frames before making your final decision. Prescription and measurement inaccuracies are another huge con when ordering your glasses online.
There’s a risk of entering your prescription information incorrectly and obtaining your PD* measurements virtually can also be tricky. This could result in receiving glasses with incorrect lenses. Lack of personal assistance with your orders can be a nuisance (no one likes calling customer service, either!) and you’ll most likely have to visit an optical to speak to a Licensed Optician in case of any needed adjustments after you receive your eyeglasses (many online retailers do not offer in-person adjustments).

Ultimately, the decision to purchase your lenses online depends on your preferences and priorities!

Always remember, to look and see your best, a Licensed Optician is your vision expert.

By: Daniella Hakim / Daniella Hakim on LinkedIn

Optical Myths: Let’s Discuss… (Vol. 1)

So, we’ve all heard or said something about eyewear that may not be quite so accurate and we may not know exactly where it came from. There are things that seem to just “Stick” in our memory without any real knowledge of whether or not it’s true; but it SOUNDS plausible.

In this post, we’ll explore a few of these items and give some insight on the truth behind some of the “Optical Myths”.

So, let’s uncover some optical items that are widely spoken about but may not be completely accurate;

“Wearing my prescription eyeglasses are making my vision worse”

“This is one of the most common myths we encounter. As we age, our vision normally changes as our natural lens inside our eye changes and your vision can get worse on its own. Glasses are not contributing to any degeneration of your eyesight. Glasses refract your vision by simply adjusting the direction of light onto your retina. Your vision may appear “worse” after wearing the glasses, but that’s only because your perception is changing now that you are getting used to seeing things more clearly.” – Dr. Dana Gampel, O.D.

“The medicine in my lenses aren’t strong enough”

“Glasses don’t actually have “medicine” in them. The lenses inside your spectacles are shaped in a way that bends light entering your eye to focus it directly on your retina. This is how it creates a clear image for your brain to process.” -Dr. Dana Gampel, O.D.

As well as prescription glasses not having “medicine” in them, it’s important to note that the discomfort or ineffectiveness you may be experiencing with your eyewear may simply be the need for a new prescription. Consult your local Optometrist or a trusted Licensed Optician to schedule a comprehensive eye exam at your earliest convenience.

“Why can’t I just get over-the-counter distance glasses?”

“Over the Counter distance glasses may not correct your vision to the extent needed. These glasses will not correct for myopia and do not include any correction for astigmatism. Also, these glasses cannot accommodate for those who have a different prescription for each eye.” -Dr. Dana Gampel, O.D.

Over the Counter glasses are basically used for those that need reading glasses, helping them read or see smaller items up close. There are a few common names for over-the-counter glasses, such as “cheater readers”, “readers”, and “magnifiers” just to name a few.

As always, “To look and see your best, a Licensed Optician is your Vision Expert”. Contact your Eye Doctor or a trusted Licensed Optician for more information about eye exams and overall eye health.

Lenses: Blue Light Filtering

So… Blue Light Filtering Lenses… What are they? How do they protect you? Do you “need” them? Do they even work?!

Let’s chat about what “Blue Light” is, first and foremost. Without getting too wrapped up in the science of Blue Light technology, Blue Light is a High-Energy Visible (HEV) Light with one of the shortest visible wavelengths viewable by the eye. The wavelength of Blue Light is between 380nm to ~500nm.

With that being said, Blue Light is not your enemy. Let’s think of it as a “Double Edged Sword”. While Blue Light coming from it’s most natural source (The Sun) is good for you, our many other artificial sources (Cell Phones, Tablets, Fluorescent Lighting, etc.) introduce an inundation of Blue Light to our eyes, more than we are equipped to handle. Exposure to too much Blue Light over a prolonged period of time can potentially lead to Macular Degeneration, Eye Fatigue and Decreased REM sleep, to name a few.

There are two main lens technologies that address our Blue Light Dilemma:

  • Indoor Blue Light Filtering
  • Outdoor Blue Light Filtering

Indoor Blue Light Filtering

Indoor Blue Light Filtering Lenses are simply lenses that are suitable for use when the wearer is not outdoors… as the name states. These lenses can be, but not limited to, Light Responsive (Photochromic)[I/O] Lenses, a Clear Blue Light Filtering Lens, and amber Blue Light Filtering Lens and Special Coatings that Filter/Block Blue Light.

All of these options would be suitable for indoor use and would not impede on the clarity of your vision indoors.

Outdoor Blue Light Filtering

The outdoor Blue Light Filtering options are basically all of the lenses that help protect your eyes from the sun and any outdoor HEV sources. These lenses can be, but aren’t limited to, Polarized Sun Lenses, Light Responsive Lenses (I/O) and Mirror/Flash Mirror Lenses to name a few.

The absolute best protection for your eyes outdoors is with a pair of Polarized Sunglasses. Polarization is not just the best Blue Light Filtering lens option for outdoor use, it also blocks out the “Blinding Glare” from the sun and reflective surfaces while keeping your eyes relaxed and protected. *Please don’t wear sunglasses at night while driving. Wearing sunglasses while driving at night can hinder your vision and prove to be quite hazardous.

So, do you NEED Blue Light Filtering Lenses (Indoors)?

The short answer is “No”, you don’t NEED the lenses, HOWEVER, the long answer would include all the benefits you’d be taking advantage of if you do use them. “You only get one set of eyes” a mentor of mine used to say. Why not take precautionary steps to keep them in great shape? The usage of Blue Light Filtering (indoor) Lenses would only benefit the user, with no discernible drawbacks.

Do you NEED Blue Light Filtering Lenses (Outdoor)?

The short answer is “Absolutely”, without a doubt. Polarized Sun Lenses are the best protection for your eyes while you’re outdoors, whether that be on the Water, Snow, Fields or any outdoor environment, Polarized Protection is always the best option for outdoor wear. Each Polarized lens color option has it’s benefits when worn. Consult your local Optical Shop or a trusted Licensed Optician to help you determine which Polarized lens option is best for your needs. “To look and see your best, a Licensed Optician is your vision expert”.

Lenses: Transitions (Light Responsive, Photochromic)

“Transition Lenses”.. “Photochromic”.. “The Lenses that change outside”.. “Those ones that change color when you go in the sun”..

All of these are super common ways that people generally describe “Transition/Photochromic – Light Responsive” lenses when they’re in the Optical. None of these customer descriptions are wrong, but I’ll give you some pointers on what to look for when selecting your new Light Responsive Lenses as well as some cool features that these lenses have!

Apart from the science behind Photochromic Lenses, these lenses are generally really cool with quite a few user features that many customers weren’t aware of. What are a few basic features of these cool lenses, you say? Well, glad you asked…

  • This lens option generally comes in multiple color options! Some of the most common options are Grey, Brown and Green. Consult your local optical shop or a trusted Licensed Optician for more details on color options.
  • Light Responsive Lenses have a built-in Blue Light Filter! Since these lenses are activated by intense levels of UV (unseen Blue Light), there is an unintended, but super useful benefit to having them! The Blue Light from your digital devices, fluorescent lighting and other sources aren’t intense enough to activate the lenses, but the lenses will act as a Blue Light Barrier while you wear them.
  • There are “Polarized” Transition Options! That’s right, there are options for the lenses to become polarized (Sun Lenses!) once fully activated by the sun. Consult your local optical shop or a trusted Licensed Optician for details about this lens option.
  • There are Transition Lenses options that allow the lenses to change while you’re in the car.
  • You can combine a multitude of options with Light Responsive Lens technology such as: Progressive Lenses (Multifocal), BiFocals, Hi-Index Lenses, Anti-Reflective Coatings, Flash Mirrors, and much more.

There are many options to fit many different needs. Although Light Responsive Lenses offer many benefits, there are a few drawbacks. What are these drawbacks, you say? Let’s explore…

  • Although the lenses get to their maximum darkness in a matter of seconds, they generally take several minutes to return to their original clarity. Depending on the brand of Light Responsive lenses used, you may experience faster transition times than others. Consult your local optical shop or a trusted Licensed Optician for more details about transition times.
  • Some lens options aren’t completely clear indoors. Although this may not be such a big deal for some folks, others find the slight tint a bit a bit troubling while wearing the lenses indoors.
  • All Photochromic Lenses are not created equal! Be sure to consult your local optical shop and/or a trusted Licensed Optician when considering Photochromic options to ensure you get the product you anticipate. Ask for the options that you want and allow the professionals to recommend the products that are available to satisfy your requests.

It is important to note that “Transitions”, while being a lens type, is also a BRAND of lenses. The fact that there is a brand named after the lens technology could make purchasing these types of lenses a little tricky. The brand “Transitions” has developed a lot of very helpful and innovative technology for Photochromic Lenses and some would consider them to be in the top tier of Light Responsive lens technology. There are a few different brands to choose from and it’s valuable to understand which brand your Optical Shop and/or Licensed Optician is supplying you with.

It’s important to remember, “To look and see your best, a Licensed Optician is your vision expert”.

Glasses: How to read your Eyeglass (Spectacle) Prescription

*Sample Prescription*

So, you’ve got a new prescription for glasses and you’re not quite sure what it all means. Maybe you’d like to order glasses online or you just want to be informed on what your prescription is actually saying about your vision.

Eye Doctor’s prescriptions can look very different depending on the office you visit. Although the physical prescription may look a bit different, generally it will have all the items necessary to produce you a pair of glasses with your prescribed prescription.

Let’s dig into how to read your Spectacle Prescription and what everything on it means.

(Above is a sample eyeglass prescription. Each section is lettered to help you identify what each section is for)

Let’s dig in:

A: This is where the distinction between eyes are. “O.D.” relates to your Right Eye and “O.S.” relates to your Left Eye. The “O.D.” and “O.S.” are both acronyms, meaning “Oculus Dextrus” and “Oculus Sinister” in Latin.

B: This is where the “Sphere Power” of your prescription is placed. These figures generally go from “+/- 0.00 or PLANO” and usually increase by “+/- 0.25” increments.

C: This is the cylindrical portion of your prescription. Not everyone will have figures in this section. This is where your doctor will document the Astigmatism portion of your prescription, if you indeed have astigmatism.

D: This portion is your optical axis. The figures in this area go from 1-Degree up to 180-Degrees. The only time you will see any figures in this are is if you have a Cylindrical Power (Astigmatism). The axis, simply put, references the light passing through your eye at a certain angle. If there are no Cylinder Power values on your prescription for a certain eye, there should be no Axis values.

E: “ADD” or “ADD Power” is for patients that need a bit more assistance seeing up close. The “ADD Power” is exactly as it sounds; its additional strength ADDED to your prescription to help you see up close. This section will not have values for every patient, just those that require that additional help. The “ADD Power” will usually be in decimal form, ranging from +0.75 and usually up to as much as +4.00 and generally increases in 0.25 increments. If a patient does require an ADD Power above a +4.00 or below +0.75, your Licensed Optician can make the necessary arrangements to get any specialty lenses ordered for you.

F: The “Prism” on a prescription is for patients that require a specific type of vision correction. Usually, when Prism is prescribed, the doctor it trying to correct an ocular anomaly. Prism can be prescribed for many reason, but some common reasons are to correct double vision, to help visually balance the appearance of your eyes (for patients with ocular imbalances), for vision therapy and many other optical anomalies. A Prism tests will usually be performed by your doctor during your eye exam. Not everyone requires Prism in their prescription, so you likely wont see any figures in this field of your prescription. If you do require Prism, partner with your Eye Doctor and your Licensed Optician to ensure the correct prism is ordered for you as well as ensuring the aesthetic look of your eyewear will be appealing.

G: The “P.D.” or “Pupillary Distance” references the distance from the center of one pupil to the center of the other, in millimeters. When taken correctly, this measurement will aid in getting the Optical Center (the pin-point of your prescription) centered over your pupil so you can see the sharpest. Many times, the doctor will not have this measurement included in the prescription and you may have to get an optical professional to measure this for you. The “P.D.” isn’t generally something the doctor looks for during an Eye Exam, mainly because the distance between your eyes don’t really change what your prescription will be. The Pupillary Distance is generally taken by the Optician or Optical Staff during a transaction for glasses. The PD is a measurement necessary for the processing of prescription eyewear. If your doctor supplies the Pupillary Distance as a part of your prescription, keep it handy. If it is not supplied on your prescription, your Licensed Optician or Optical Expert can take this measurement for you as you place your order.

There are many ways to get a Pupillary Distance (Virtual, Digital, Predictive, etc.), but the most accurate will always be one taken by an Optical Professional.

H: In this section, this is where the doctor will usually make any additional recommendations for your prescription or vision needs. Sometimes, instead of “Notes”, this section may say “Recommendations” or something that will allow the doctor give additional information. This is where the doctor can communicate with the Optical Expert on what additional items are recommended for the patient’s vision care needs. Some items may be optional and others may be a vision necessity. Consult your Eye Doctor and your Licensed Optician to determine which items are a necessity and which are an option.

Contact Lenses: How to read your Contact Lens Prescription

*Sample Prescription*

So, you’ve got a new prescription for Contact Lenses and you’re not quite sure what it all means. Maybe you’d like to order Contacts online or you just want to be informed on what your prescription is actually saying about your vision.

Eye Doctor’s prescriptions can look very different depending on the office you visit. Although the physical prescription may look a bit different, generally it will have all the items necessary to get you the Contact Lens product that the Eye Doctor has prescribed for you.

Let’s dig into how to read your Contact Lens Prescription and what everything on it means.

(Above is a sample Contact Lens prescription. Each section is lettered to help you identify what each section is used for.)

Let’s dig in:

A: This is where the distinction between eyes are. “O.D.” relates to your Right Eye and “O.S.” relates to your Left Eye. The “O.D.” and “O.S.” are both acronyms, meaning “Oculus Dextrus” and “Oculus Sinister” in Latin.

B: This is where the “Sphere Power” of your prescription is placed. These figures generally go from “+/- 0.00 or PLANO” and usually increase by “+/- 0.25” increments.

C: This is the cylindrical portion of your prescription. Not everyone will have figures in this section. This is where your doctor will document the Astigmatism portion of your prescription, if you indeed have astigmatism.

D: This portion is your optical axis. The figures in this area go from 1-Degree up to 180-Degrees. The only time you will see any figures in this are is if you have a Cylindrical Power (Astigmatism). The axis, simply put, references the light passing through your eye at a certain angle. If there are no Cylinder Power values on your prescription for a certain eye, there should be no Axis values.

E: The “B.C.” or “Base Curve” refers to the Contact Lens curvature that the doctor has found best suits the curve of your cornea. This, along with the “Diameter”, are one of the reasons why the Contact Lens exam is so important. It’s the best way to get the most accurate fit for your Contact Lenses. Each contact lens may have a different “B.C.” and you want to get the one that works best for you, specifically. The figures in this field will be in decimal form, generally between 7.x and 9.x (‘X’ is whatever readings the doctor supplies).

F: The “DIA” or “Diameter” refers to the size of the contact lens. When performing a Contact Lens exam, the doctor will determine which lens is the correct curvature as well as the correct size or “Diameter”. Since most common contact lenses are generally circular, the size is measured from one end of the circle to the other end. The purpose of selecting the correct diameter is to ensure maximum breathability for your eyes and the lenses and maximum comfort while wearing the lens. If the lens is too big or too small, you could experience visual discomfort as well as physical discomfort while wearing the lenses. The figures in this area are also in decimal form, generally between 13.x and 15.x (‘X’ is whatever readings the doctor supplies)

G: The “Mult. Power” or “Multifocal Power” would be used for patients who require a Multifocal contact lens. This selection is mostly used for presbyopic (people that need additional help seeing up close) patients. The doctor will generally signify a Hi-Add, Med-Add or Lo-Add for the patients that require these lenses. If neither one of those selections are specified, the doctor may opt to write out the actual ADD POWER. Your Licensed Optician can determine, based on the prescription, which ADD POWER to order for you.

H: This area can be a bit tricky at times as some doctors may give a few options for different Contact Lenses. But, this area is where the doctor will prescribe a specific BRAND of contact lens based on all the figures and findings explained above. Not every brand has ALL prescription strengths or cover every Base Curve & Diameter. Many brands are limited to a specific set of values. So, the doctor, along with your guidance, will prescribe the brand that is best you (Visually & Comfort-wise) and fits your eyes the best, based on the exam findings.

There are many different types of contact lenses and a wide array of applications for each. The sample and explanations above reference standard soft contact lenses that are commonly used in most optical practices. If a more specialized contact lens is required, many of the explanations above will still apply, but there may be a few additional items that the doctor must supply for the Optician to get the correct lens ordered for you. Consult your Eye Doctor and your Licensed Optician if you’d like to try contact lenses for the first time or get a renewal on your last contact lens prescription.

Ophthalmologist… Optometrist… Optician… What’s the difference..?

So, it’s time to see an Eye Care Professional but you’re not sure which one you need to see.. There seems to be a few options, but which is the right one for you? Without getting too technical, we’ll give you the specs on which option would best suit your optical needs. Now, just to be totally clear, there are more than just 3 Eye Care Professions, but lets break down 3 commonly used (and may times confused) Optical Professionals.

Ophthalmologist: The American Academy of Ophthalmology defines an Ophthalmologist (also known as an Eye M.D.) as “a medical or osteopathic doctor who specializes in eye and vision care. Ophthalmologists differ from optometrists and opticians in their levels of training and in what they can diagnose and treat.” You can consider and Ophthalmologist as a “Specialist” with your eyes. You’d visit this doctor when you require surgeries and extended care for conditions such as Cataracts, Glaucoma or a traumatic eye injury, to name a few. The Ophthalmologist can perform many of the same tasks as an Optometrist, yet their objective is to provide more specialized vision care.

Optometrist: The American Academy of Ophthalmology defines an Optometrist (also known as an Eye Doctor) as “healthcare professionals who provide primary vision care ranging from vision testing and correction to the diagnosis, treatment, and management of vision changes.” Your eye doctor is the one that will administer the Comprehensive Health Check (roughly, yearly), Eye Exams, Standard Dilation, Contact Lens Exams and Spectacle & Contact Lens Prescriptions. You should visit your Eye Doctor for any vision changes you may be experiencing as well as to get the overall health of your eyes and vision checked. While your doctor is performing their exam, if they encounter something that needs further attention, they may refer you to a specialist (an Ophthalmologist). A wide range of vision care tasks can be performed by your Optometrist, such as treatment for Glaucoma, Cataracts, Diabetes and Macular Degeneration; but in some instances, additional and/or extended testing or care may be necessary.

Optician: So, an Optician (or Licensed Optician, depending on your state) is the eye care professional that will ensure that you receive what the doctor ordered. Most times, the doctors will make recommendations for your vision care and leave any additional options up to the Optical for guidance. The Opticians are responsible for ensuring the prescription that is being dispensed to you is the same as what the doctor prescribed. The Opticians are responsible for ensuring that your new (or reused) eyewear will be suitable for the prescription, suitable for processing and fit you properly. Opticians are also responsible for being the Optical Knowledge-Base in any optical location. I generally tell clients, that aren’t sure about an Opticians role, to think of us a “Optical Pharmacists”. We take the prescriptions that your doctor writes, make any adjustments based on your needs, and fill the Rx as needed. There are many other “hats” that opticians wear in the Optical, but these are just a few to help you understand the differences between these Optical Professionals.

In the Optical World, there are many different professionals that are integral to getting you the best vision care. Some of these professionals can be referred to as “The Unsung Hero’s” of the industry; Such as (Just to name a few):

  • Doctor’s Technicians
  • Specialty Contact Lens Fitters
  • Optical Lab Technicians
  • Eyewear Consultants
  • Greeters
  • If we missed you in the list, you’re still an Optical Hero! 😉

As always, if there is any confusion as to where to go for your Eyewear and Eye Care needs, or you just need a bit of direction, a Licensed Optician is always a great knowledge-base. Find your local Licensed Optician and inquire about any questions you may have regarding your Glasses, Contact Lenses and/or Exams. “To Look & See your best, a Licensed Optician is your vision expert.”

All of these different lens options! What’s the big difference?! Do I even need any of it?

Great questions! And, the short answer is “Yes”. The not-so-short and usually correct answer is “Yes AND No”. Allow us to explain…

So, let’s talk about lens additions.. There are so many to choose from, but let’s try to narrow it down to some of the most common and most popular items that your local Eyeglass Store or Licensed Optician may offer you.

Just to name a few options:

  • Anti-Reflective Coating
  • Blue Light Filtering (Clear or Traditional)
  • Transitions (Light Responsive)
  • Polarized
  • Mirror Coating
  • Tinted
  • UV Treatment
  • Scratch Resistance

Anti-Reflective Coating: This option is often times called “Anti-Glare” or “Non-Glare” coating. This is beneficial for everyday use and generally gives you the best visual experience. This option cuts out, roughly, 90%+ of outside glare and reflection perceived by your eyes. If you choose nothing else, this is a great option to take advantage of.

Blue Light Filtering: This option has become increasingly popular over the last few years and is beneficial to most people. Basically, there is an increasing number of sources that emit Blue Light that may be harmful to our eyes. A few of the biggest sources of Blue Light are the Sun, your Mobile Devices and Fluorescent Lighting. This option is definitely worth considering when getting a new pair of lenses.

Transitions (Light Responsive): There are quite a few Light Responsive options in terms of Colors, Brands and how they serve you. Some of the more popular options for color changes are True Grey, Brown and G-15 (Green/Grey), although there are many more color options available. Depending on your needs, there are options that become Polarized Sun Lenses when they get dark, options that activate behind the windshield of your car and then there is the traditional option that changes only in direct UV contact. Light Responsive Lenses also Filter Blue Light, as an added benefit.

Polarized & Mirror Coating: Polarized Lenses are generally used in sunglasses to block out Blinding Glare from reflective sources and surfaces. The Mirror Coating is an added protectant for blocking glare while adding a very cool aesthetic to your lenses. Mirrored Lenses are literally what the name implies, Lenses with a Mirror Coating on the front side.

Tinted Lenses: Tinted Lenses are not as popular of an option as polarized lenses, but there are still some very cool and necessary applications. The lenses are more customizable, in terms of color and/or shade; gradient or solid. It’s not always the best option, but sometimes it’s the right one for you.

UV Treatment & Scratch Resistance: UV Protection and Scratch Resistance are some of the most common options and generally are standard items already included in your lenses. There are times where they are an option and if you are ever faced with the “option” to either take it or leave it, please take it. UV Protection helps protect your eyes from Ultraviolet rays that cause many different eye illnesses, such as Cataracts, Retinal Damage and other avoidable issues. Scratch Resistance is just as the name suggests, it helps the lens resist scratches during normal use. Please remember, your lenses will be Scratch RESISTANT, not Scratch PROOF.

Many of the options can be mixed and matched for your individual needs. For instance, you can have a Blue Filtering Lens with Anti-Reflective Coating, Scratch Resistance and UV Treatment. All things are beneficial for your eyes and most likely will satisfy your visual needs. The mixing and matching of the options is largely the reason why “Yes AND No” is the answer to the question. ‘Yes” because they’re all beneficial to you in many ways and “No” because you don’t necessarily “need” all of the options at once.

We recommend finding a Licensed Optician or Eyewear Professional that you trust, determining the options available to you and taking advantage of the ones that best serve your needs. Do a bit of research, ask a lot of questions and make the decision that you feel best serves your needs and budget.

Sunglasses: Polarized vs. Non Polarized

“Polarized.. Non Polarized… What’s the big difference?!”

What are “Polarized” Lenses? Why do I need them? What’s the difference if my lenses aren’t “Polarized”?

These are very common question with a surprisingly simple answer. So, lets address each one of the questions individually.

What are “Polarized” Lenses? – Polarized Lenses are typically Sunglass Lenses that block out “Blinding Glare” from different light sources. So, basically, while wearing Polarized Lenses you should experience better visual comfort because of less strain on your eyes from outside glare. Polarized Lenses can be considered an “Anti-Reflective” in sunglass form.

Why do I need them? – In our everyday life, an inundation of outdoor light & glare can destroy our eyes without the proper protection. 25-50% of all automotive accidents are caused by distracted drivers. “Blinding Glare” is a big factor and can impair your vision for a short period of time. Depending on your age, that short period of time varies and the effects can last for quite a few moments. This is not the best thing to experience as you’re moving along the roadways in your vehicle. Polarized Lenses help eliminate that Blinding Glare.

What’s the difference if my lenses aren’t Polarized? – In the event that your lenses aren’t Polarized, it’s not the worst thing. There are instances where Non-Polarized Lenses are beneficial. For example, many Pilots aren’t able to wear Polarized Lenses because of the instrumentation polarization in their Flight Decks. Many consumers aren’t comfortable wearing Polarized Lenses because of the instrumentation polarization in their vehicles. In these cases, we recommend Non-Polarized Lenses with UV Filtering and/or Tinted Lenses with UV Filtering. Although these options aren’t quite as effective as Polarization, they still offer some protection from outside glare and the effects of UV rays on our eyes. There are a few additional options that may benefit your specific needs. Consult your Local Optician to discuss what may work best for you.